The yard and garden are giving hints that Fall is getting closer. The poke berries are gone and the leaves are wilting. Tomato plants and potatoes are drying up and I couldn’t be happier. I get excited about pumpkin flavored things and freak out when the first leaves start to drop.

Now that’s out of the way, let’s talk about the vegetable garden. It looks horrible right now. Part is covered with weeds, part is starting to die off, but part of the garden is ready for fall plants.  This week, we are planting more Nantes carrots, which did really well last year, and peas.

Back in the spring I planted peas and failed them. Somehow I planted them then moved on to other parts of the garden, completely forgetting about them. They grew quickly, but with no supports to climb, they knotted up into wads about 6″ high. I tried to correct the issues by building a half-assed trellis and carefully tried to untangle the plants,  but it was too late.

So, with this planting I am working on the soil and adding a permanent support for them them to climb.  Peas are new to me this year. I read that they like phosphorus and potassium, which made me think of the 3 bananas I found in the back of the fridge. After some research I learned that it’s actually pretty common to put banana peels (organic is best) in the garden for the nutrients. Most sites call for chopping up and dropping the banana on the ground to decay, or burying them near the plants.  Our dogs have been known to break into the garden to investigate new smells (resulting in them eating every squash plant after they were sprayed with fish emulsion).

For that reason, I went with a banana tea recipe. Hopefully once it dries, and the ground is turned over there will be little trace of the banana. Wishful thinking anyway.

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For this experiment,  I took the 3 very very ripe bananas, removed the stickers,  and chopped them up into chucks small enough to fit in the blender. The skins and the fruit can be used here – they both have beneficial nutrients. The stems were very dry and hard, so I removed them.  These bananas looked bad, but had no rot – I would have trashed the rotten pieces. I blended them with a little water and added them to the biggest metal container I could find. About 12 cups of  hot water were then added to the pot and it was allowed to steep overnight. This is not a pretty process (thus no pic of the finished product), but it smelled like banana bread, so it wasn’t that bad.

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The next day I took the mixture and poured all over the area that will soon be the pea bed and trellis. Next steps are to add a bit of better soil to the spot and turn the dirt just to mix it all a bit.

Keep in mind this is an experiment and I will follow up with results. It sounds like it should be beneficial, right? Here is another resource if you are curious about the other ways of using bananas in your garden.

We will see!

 

Quick steps:

  1. Remove stickers, any rotten sections, hard peel (or anything that wont blend well)
  2. Cut into chunks appropriate for your blender or food processor.
  3. Blend like a madman.
  4. Pour mixture into large pot capable of holding hot liquids that is also easy to carry.
  5. Add hot water and allow to steep. (Above I used 12 cups of water and 3 bananas. I based the amount of water on the amount of garden area I wanted to cover.)

 

 

 

 

 

 

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